Creating a Nurturing Management Approach

18839503_s As you have probably noticed, one of the main objectives of LifeThrive is to help you understand that managing is only part of your job. Most marketing managers have learned, either by instruction or direction, how to manage.

However, this is simply not enough, nor will it take you down the road of long-term success in today’s competitive industry. Leadership is a better approach to achieving success. Nurturing and developing individual character traits and competencies will fill in the gaps, build a credible department and assure you of the “best-in-class” reputation.

To achieve a high of success you must take a step beyond assigning tasks and expecting results. These steps may include management, but must also include coaching, mentoring and leadership. Rarely will you inspire someone by telling them what to do or ordering them around.

You must nurture the desired characters which you have deemed critical to a specific job description. If a person does not fit, then they don’t fit. If they do have most of the characteristics you need, nurture them by building new competencies.

While it is critical for a marketing manager to have deep industry experience, someone with deeply developed people skills may be able to achieve greater results than an industry expert if they are able to apply their employee’s talents to their potential. This is why Talent Management experts are employed with such great success today.

You are in your position for a reason – you have the skills and potential to succeed. Augment your industry knowledge with an understanding of differing characteristics so you can manage AND develop your team. Start by accessing the assessment tools given by your HR or Talent Management group. Study them and identify the key characteristics of each individual. Then compare them to yours so you will know how to lead, manage and adapt in multiple scenarios.

As your understanding deepens, you will be able to identify other tools for managing and developing character that will help you build a culture of nurture management.

The first step toward establishing vision is to help your people understand it. Explain this new approach and mentality to the department so they understand your objective(s). When you identify the reasoning behind these changes, and how they relate to employee success, you will likely garner support.

You will, undoubtedly, have some naysayers, but this is to be expected. If they understand that this will be a learning process for everyone, and that there will be bumps along the way, your level of cooperation will improve on a regular basis.

The next step is to help them see how character differences will have an impact on completing objectives. The variances, or gaps, take time to bridge and there must be unified mindsets and values to build those bridges so the behaviors don’t get in the way.

As you evaluate your departmental goals, identify the mindsets needed to fulfill those goals and share them with your team. Tell them what they must do to strengthen those mindsets for individual and group success. Then, allow them the opportunity to share their individual success based on these values. Each team member will learn how to provide insight to their team, as well as what might build individual and thereby team success.

Your most important step or goal as a leader is to inspire your team. However, in order for them to help each other, they will need individual direction about the characteristics that help and hinder their personal success. Given this insight, they will be more adept at helping others.